I Ching Hexagram Lookup

If you’ve already cast the coins, you can use this chart to look up your hexagram number, which is linked to that reading. The first three lines you cast are the “Lower Trigram” and the second three form the “Upper Trigram.” Remember that if you have changing lines, pay special attention to those lines only, and you can get a sense of what the future holds by looking up your future hexagram that the changing lines produce when they are flipped into their opposite.

 

Upper
Trigram
Quian Zhen Kan Gen Kun Xun Li Dui
Lower
Trigram
Quian 1 34 5 26 11 9 14 43
Zhen 25 51 3 27 24 42 21 17
Kan 6 40 29 4 7 59 64 47
Gen 33 62 39 52 15 53 56 31
Kun 12 16 8 23 2 20 35 45
Xun 44 32 48 18 46 57 50 28
Li 13 55 63 22 36 37 30 49
Dui 10 54 60 41 19 61 38 58

 

Other I Ching Books and Resources

Like any other ancient text, I Ching books on the market today offer an assortment of translations to choose from. Some translators have modernized the text, removing gender bias and archaic language. Others have elaborated on the explanations, and only roughly paraphrase the original text. There is a wide range of quality in translations. Although the Wilhelm/Baynes version by Princeton Press, with its forward by Carl Jung, is the most popular translation of the Chinese, the translation was probably tainted by the politics of the 19th century and tends to be slightly Germanic (having been translated first into German, then English from that). Also, the Princeton version preserves the militarism and sexism of patriarchal China going back to the time of Confucius and before. Paul O’Brien’s modern interpretation, The Visionary I Ching, is in basic alignment with the Princeton version, but it is non-sexist and non-militaristic, and among the easiest for Westerners to understand and use, which is why we had produced it in the form of multimedia software (on Tarot.com) and now offer it to the world in e-book form.